Investigation of released CO2 and consumed energy for two different usages of electrified vehicles of various levels, operating in service situations

Examensarbete för masterexamen

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Type: Examensarbete för masterexamen
Master Thesis
Title: Investigation of released CO2 and consumed energy for two different usages of electrified vehicles of various levels, operating in service situations
Authors: Rosén, Jonna
Abstract: This report aims to study the possible implementation of electrified vehicles in two specific but differently demanding service situations; Hemtjänsten & Flexlinjen. The study included not only different petrol mixes with ethanol; 95% and 90% petrol, but also several electricity mixes where the denotation Worst symbolises Scandinavian Electricity mix and Ultimate is what could be produced in the future (100% hydro power). The study reveals that the more electricity used the less CO2 emissions (g/km). If using a hybrid electric vehicle in Hemtjänsten instead of a fuel operated vehicle the reduction of CO2 emissions is more than 41%, a remarkable save of more than 1000 kg of CO2 per year. If Hemtjänsten instead would use a battery electric vehicle the reduction would be almost 50% even considering the, for Sweden, worst possible electricity mix with burning fossils. There is an almost 90% reduction in CO2 emissions (more than 2000 kg/year) for the upper range of Sweden’s electricity median. For Flexlinjen, the gains are similar, although proposed emission level regulations will be harder to lie under.
Keywords: Elkraftteknik;Electric power engineering
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Chalmers tekniska högskola / Institutionen för energi och miljö
Chalmers University of Technology / Department of Energy and Environment
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12380/176658
Collection:Examensarbeten för masterexamen // Master Theses



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