Concept exploration of spacecraft separation structures using evolutionary optimization

Examensarbete för masterexamen

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12380/305051
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Type: Examensarbete för masterexamen
Title: Concept exploration of spacecraft separation structures using evolutionary optimization
Authors: Arnebro Söderberg, Erik
Abstract: Conventional concept exploration tends to be narrowly focused around previous solutions, especially in an industry with as much emphasis on reliability as aerospace engineering. A drawback of this approach is the likelihood of high performing design concepts existing outside that narrow design domain. In this thesis project a tool is developed which aims to augment the concept exploration phase by autonomously searching a broad range of feasible solutions. The search converges to the non-dominated set by means of multi-objective evolutionary optimization, wherein the structures are optimized for lower mass and higher natural frequency. The candidate solutions are modelled, meshed, and structurally analysed using open-source software. The tool was tested on two different types of structures, namely launch vehicle adapters (LVA) and satellite dispenser structures. LVA design solutions with both higher natural frequency (up to 4% increase) and reduced mass were discovered. The results show that the developed method is able to converge to a set of high performing solutions, and present these to the user as input for subsequent design decisions.
Keywords: Multi-objective evolutionary optimization;automated finite element analysis;aerospace engineering
Issue Date: 2022
Publisher: Chalmers tekniska högskola / Institutionen för mekanik och maritima vetenskaper
Series/Report no.: 2022:30
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12380/305051
Collection:Examensarbeten för masterexamen // Master Theses



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